🇩🇪 Crowdfunding campagne to save the oceans from plastics with Pacific Garbage Screening!

10 days to go to support the crowdfunding initiative from Pacific Garbage Screening to reach the funding target of 200,000 €.

Why is it so innovative? Because it works without nets and, thus, is not harming any fish or living beings. The swimming platform only uses its unique architecture design to capture plastics and plastic particles.

Support Pacific Garbage Screening here!

 

Why is it so important to support this idea? 

Garbage and, especially, plastics have a strong impact on the environment …

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… and garbage patches like this exist all over the world.

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The world’s ocean currents …

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… create these poisonous islands of floating plastic.

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This is how it looks!

Support Pacific Garbage Screening here!

Sources

🇪🇺 EU Member States approve Circular Economy Package (CEP)

The final legislative hurdle to creating a more resource efficient Europe has been overcome after the Council of the European Union approved the EU’s Circular Economy Package (CEP) in Brussels on Tuesday, 22 May 2018.

The final ratification by the Council comes a little over a month after MEPs in the European Parliament gave the set of revised waste directives their seal of approval, ratifying the targets agreed upon following the end of three-way discussions known as trilogues between the European Council, Commission and Parliament back in December, which were then approved by EU ambassadors in February this year. The announcement marks the end of a long journey through the institutions since the Juncker Commission put the current legislation forward in 2015, after withdrawing a draft CEP put forward in July 2014 that included a 70 per cent recycling and reuse target for 2030.

Progress on moving towards a circular economy has been steady since the start of the year, as a Monitoring Framework to measure the EU’s progress towards the CEP targets was also proposed by the European Commission in March, while a Plastics Strategy was agreed at the start of March, with an aim of making all plastic packaging recyclable by 2030.

The new legislation means that EU member states will be obliged to reach a 55 per cent municipal recycling rate by 2025, 60 per cent by 2030 and 65 per cent by 2035. Confusion over the headline target was apparent in the first few months of the year, with many reporting the 65 per cent figure as the 2030 target, as opposed to the 2035 target.

Specific targets for packaging for 2030 are also included for all packaging (70 per cent), plastic (55 per cent), wood (30 per cent), ferrous metals (80 per cent), aluminium (60 per cent), glass (75 per cent) and paper and cardboard (85 per cent).
In addition to material-specific targets, member states will have until 1 January 2025 to set up a separate collection for textile waste and hazardous waste from households and until 31 December 2023 to ensure that bio-waste is either collected separately or recycled at source (e.g., home composting).

A landfill reduction target is also included in the package, with member states expected to ensure that, as of 2030, all waste suitable for recycling or other recovery shall not be accepted in landfills, except waste for which landfilling is the best environmental outcome. In addition, member states will ensure that by 2035 the amount of municipal waste being sent to landfill is reduced to less than 10 per cent of the total amount of municipal waste generated.

Furthermore, the new legislation foresees more use of effective economic instruments and other measures in support of the waste hierarchy. Producers are given an important role in this transition by making them responsible for their products when they become waste. New requirements for extended producer responsibility schemes to improve their performance and governance are included in the CEP. In addition, mandatory extended producer responsibility schemes have to be established for all packaging by 2024.
Now that the Council has ratified the CEP, it will enter into force 20 days after its publication in the Official Journal, with 24 months allowed for the governments of member states to transpose the new laws into national legislation.

Despite the perpetual uncertainty surrounding Brexit and the form of the UK’s future relationship with the EU, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) has indicated that the CEP will apply to the UK following Brexit, even going so far as to suggest that the UK would set even more ambitious targets than those contained in the landmark European agreement.

Commenting on the announcement, EU Commissioner for Environment, Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, Karmenu Vella, said: “The final approval of new EU waste rules by the Council marks an important moment for the circular economy in Europe. The new recycling and landfilling targets set a credible and ambitious path for better waste management in Europe. Our main task now is to ensure that the promises enshrined in this waste package are delivered on the ground. The Commission will do all it can to support Member States and make the new legislation deliver on the ground.”

Neno Dimov, Bulgarian Minister of Environment and Water, added: “I am very pleased that ministers have given their approval to the revised legislation on waste today. Europe is moving towards a circular economy. These new rules protect not only our environment but also the health of our citizens. Today we close the loop of product lifecycles, from production and consumption to waste management. This decision is about making our economies more sustainable and environmentally-friendly.”

Link to original article

🇫🇷 PM Edouard Philippe launches anti-waste plan for circular economy

On 23 April 2018 French Prime Minister Edouard Phlippe announced a plan to boost the “circular economy”, clamping down on waste and encouraging recycling.

“One obsolescence we are convinced of today … is the model where we extract, manufacture, sell and throw away,” Philippe said on a visit to the Seb Moulinex factory in Mayenne, northern France. The electronic goods manufacturer’s plant was chosen because it has made a speciality of producing repairable products. He announced an anti-waste battle plan that will encourage recycling and incite companies to produce goods that are more robust and easier to repair.

Among the proposed measures are:

  • A target of 100 percent recyclable plastic by 2025;
  • Reduction of resource consumption by 30 percent by 2030;
  • The creation of 300,000 jobs in the circular economy, their present number being estimated at 800,000;
  • By 2020 manufacturers of electronic goods and furniture will have to inform consumers of their products’ life expectancy and how they may be repaired;
  • The law on guarantees will be tightened up and a website set up for consumer complaints;
  • A new industrial sector should be established for the recycling of toys, sports and DIY goods and mobile phones, of which 30 million “are slumbering in French people’s draws”, according to Philippe.
  • VAT will be reduced for recycling and the anti-pollution tax raised;
  • TV licence fees will be proportionate to a household’s waste.

The building industry, which is responsible for 70 percent of France’s waste, is to be one of the bill’s principal targets.

“It’s about directing consumption towards the most robust products (…) and products that can be repaired more easily,” said Philippe. The text also plans to increase the legal compliance period (guarantee), now set at two years, at European level, and to facilitate complaints to consumers via an internet portal provided for this purpose.

In addition to the goal of “extending the life of products and developing repair”, the government plan aims to develop recycling channels. A single logo, “Triman”, will indicate for example if this or that product is recyclable.

France still has some way to go towards being waste-free. Its waste-recovery rate was 39 percent in 2014, compared to 65 percent in Germany and 50 percent in Belgium. Less plastic is recycled than the European average, with 55 percent of plastic bottles collected, compared to 90 percent in Scandinavia.

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unsplash-logoCelvin Purnama

Sources:

(1) http://en.rfi.fr/20180423-france-launches-war-waste

(2) https://www.devdiscourse.com/Article/4870-edouard-philippe-launches-anti-waste-plan-for-circular-economy/Europe%20and%20Central%20Asia

🇸🇪 Sustainable innovation Altered:Nozzle enables you to save up to 98% tap water – same tap, same service!

Freshwater is one of our world’s most precious resources and it is getting increasingly more demanded by a growing world population. Furthermore, droughts, pollution and limited availability in large or rapidly growing cities put additional pressure on water supplies.

Did you ever ask yourself how you as an individual can save water?

The Swedish innovation company Altered: invented a unique way to enable you to save up to 98% of your tap water! No big installations needed, same tap, same service!

What a great sustainable innovation!

 

Link to company website

🇺🇸 Apple introduces Daisy – an iPhone-recycling robot

Ahead of Earth Day, Apple has debuted a new robot named Daisy that can take apart iPhones in order to recover valuable materials inside, as reported by TechCrunch and The Verge (with video).

The robot is a successor to Liam, another recycling robot made by Apple that was revealed in 2016. In fact, Daisy was created with some of Liam’s old parts, making it a recycled robot that helps recycle iPhones. Daisy is capable of taking apart nine different versions of the iPhone, and it can disassemble up to 200 iPhones an hour. It also separates parts and removes certain components as it goes.

Along with Daisy, Apple has also announced a temporary program called GiveBack, where customers can turn in devices in store or through Apple.com to be recycled. For every device received from now until April 30th, Apple will make a donation to Conservation International. (Eligible devices will still receive an in-store or gift card credit.)

Link to original article

Statistic: Global Aluminum Cycle

The International Aluminium Institute offers on their website a great insight into the aluminium life cycle of the world from 1962 until 2016 and beyond with predictions until 2030.

It is highly interesting to see how strong the mass of aluminium within chemical compounds increased over time and especially within the last 10 years after the global financial crisis in 2008. Even though remanufacturing and recycling heightened in accordance there is still much room to improve utilisation of this important light metal.

Link to source:
http://www.world-aluminium.org/statistics/massflow/

 

Global Aluminum Scycle 2016

🌍 CEC launches the #CircularEconomy Mapping Week

From 5-11 February 2018 the Circular Economy Club launches the #CircularEconomy Mapping Week. What is it? Volunteer organisers in all parts of the world will set up group sessions to map circular initiatives in their cities.

Why? One of the challenges in implementing the circular economy framework is the need for more practical examples, to better understand what is working and what is not. The Mapping Week exists to gather as many examples as possible in an open online directory. 

If you would like to participate in a global week and help create an online directory of circular initiatives worldwide or if you are a changemaker who wishes to host a session in order to build a local community of circular economy professionals and help advance the circular framework, click here.