Interview: Petra Künkel on Collective Leadership

Version française


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I am happy to share with you the first interview for CurvN. I had the pleasure to talk to a long time supporter of sustainable coopertions – Petra Kuenkel. She is a psychologist, founder of the Collective Leadership Institute, full-member of the Club of Rome, and has many years of experience in consulting multiple stakeholder collaborations for sustainability. Her acquired knowledge out of these manifold experiences combined with her profound education resulted in the Collective Leadership Compass that she presents in her current book The Art of Leading Collectively: Co-Creating a Sustainable, Socially Just Future.

Enjoy the interview!

In the infographic you’ll find my key take-aways from her book! Anyway, the book is definetly worth reading 😉

interview petra kuenkel - the art of leading collectively (english)

Download here: Infographic of Petra Kuenkel – Collective Leadership Compass (English)


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Ich freue mich, euch das erste Interview für CurvN zu präsentieren. Ich hatte das Vergnügen mit einer langjährigen Unterstützerin nachhaltiger Kooperationen zu sprechen – Petra Künkel. Sie ist Psychologin, Gründerin des Collective Leadership Institute, Vollmitglied des Club of Rome und verfügt über langjährige Erfahrung in der Beratung von Multistakeholder-Kooperationen für Nachhaltigkeit. Ihr erworbenes Wissen aus diesen vielfältigen Erfahrungen in Verbindung mit ihrer fundierten Ausbildung resultierte in dem Collective Leadership Compass. Welchen sie in ihrem aktuellen Buch The Art of Leading Collectively: Co-Creating a Sustainable, Socially Just Future präsentiert.

Viel Spaß mit dem Interview!

In der Infografik habe ich euch eine kurzen Überblick über die für mich wichtigsten Punkte des Buches zusammengestellt. Im Buch findet ihr allerdings noch eine Menge mehr Informationen 😉

interview petra kuenkel - the art of leading collectively (deutsch)


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Me complace compartir con ustedes la primera entrevista para CurvN. Tuve el placer de hablar con una partidaria de cooperativas sostenibles desde hace mucho tiempo: Petra Kuenkel. Es psicóloga, fundadora del Instituto de Liderazgo Colectivo, miembro de pleno derecho del Club de Roma y tiene muchos años de experiencia en la consultoría de múltiples colaboraciones de partes interesadas para la sostenibilidad. Su conocimiento adquirido a partir de estas experiencias múltiples combinado con su profunda educación resultó en la Brújula de Liderazgo Colectivo que presenta en su libro actual The Art of Leading Collectively: Co-Creating a Sustainable, Socially Just Future.

¡Diviértete con la entrevista!

¡En la infografía encontrarás mis claves para llevar de su libro! De todos modos, vale la pena leerlo 😉

interview petra kuenkel - the art of leading collectively (spanish)


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Je suis heureux de partager avec vous la première interview pour CurvN. J’ai eu le plaisir de parler à un défenseur de longue date des coopératives durables – Petra Kuenkel. Elle est psychologue, fondatrice de l’Institut de leadership collectif, membre à part entière du Club de Rome et possède de nombreuses années d’expérience dans la consultation de multiples collaborations entre parties prenantes pour le développement durable. Ses connaissances acquises à partir de ces multiples expériences combinées à sa profonde éducation ont débouché sur le Compass Leadership Compass qu’elle présente dans son livre actuel The Art of Leading Collectively: Co-Creating a Sustainable, Socially Just Future.

Amusez-vous avec l’interview!

Dans l’infographie, vous trouverez mes clés à retenir de son livre! Quoi qu’il en soit, il vaut la peine de lire 😉

interview petra kuenkel - the art of leading collectively (french)

Download here: Infographic of Petra Kuenkel – Collective Leadership Compass (French)

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Icons made by Freepik from www.flaticon.com is licensed by CC 3.0 BY

 

Infographic: The Anatomy of a Smart City

Today, 55% of the world’s population lives in urban areas, a proportion that is expected to increase to 68% by 2050. Projections show that urbanization, the gradual shift in residence of the human population from rural to urban areas, combined with the overall growth of the world’s population could add another 2.5 billion people to urban areas by 2050, with close to 90% of this increase taking place in Asia and Africa, according to an United Nations data set launched on 16 May 2018 (Link).

The 2018 Revision of World Urbanization Prospects produced by the Population Division of the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UN DESA) notes that future increases in the size of the world’s urban population are expected to be highly concentrated in just a few countries. Together, India, China and Nigeria will account for 35% of the projected growth of the world’s urban population between 2018 and 2050. By 2050, it is projected that India will have added 416 million urban dwellers, China 255 million and Nigeria 189 million.

The urban population of the world has grown rapidly from 751 million in 1950 to 4.2 billion in 2018. Asia, despite its relatively lower level of urbanization, is home to 54% of the world’s urban population, followed by Europe and Africa with 13% each.

Nowadays, the most urbanized regions include Northern America (with 82% of its population living in urban areas in 2018), Latin America and the Caribbean (81%), Europe (74%) and Oceania (68%). The level of urbanization in Asia is now approximating 50%. In contrast, Africa remains mostly rural, with 43% of its population living in urban areas.

What kind of impacts this crucial development has and how Smart Cities are expected to cope with them is nicely put together by Visual Capitalist in the following infographic.
Courtesy of: Visual Capitalist

 

🇪🇺🇨🇳 China and EU signed ‘historic’ memorandum about the circular economy

At the 20th EU-China Summit in Bejing this week recycling was one of the core topics. Co-operation by the two major world economies is said to cover sustainable strategies, legislation, policies and research. More specifically, it will focus on management systems and policy tools including eco-design, eco-labelling, extended producer responsibility and green supply chains as well as financing of the circular economy. Both sides have pledged that they will support a ‘strategic exchange’ on best practices in key fields such as industrial parks, chemicals, plastics and waste.

This confirms the road China is heading towards sustainability. In January 2017, Xi Jinping announced to spend 252 billion Yuan (US$ 37 billion) from 2017 to 2020 for improving the waste situation in his country.

Sources:

🇩🇪 Crowdfunding campagne to save the oceans from plastics with Pacific Garbage Screening!

10 days to go to support the crowdfunding initiative from Pacific Garbage Screening to reach the funding target of 200,000 €.

Why is it so innovative? Because it works without nets and, thus, is not harming any fish or living beings. The swimming platform only uses its unique architecture design to capture plastics and plastic particles.

Support Pacific Garbage Screening here!

 

Why is it so important to support this idea? 

Garbage and, especially, plastics have a strong impact on the environment …

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… and garbage patches like this exist all over the world.

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The world’s ocean currents …

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… create these poisonous islands of floating plastic.

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This is how it looks!

Support Pacific Garbage Screening here!

Sources

🇪🇺 EU Member States approve Circular Economy Package (CEP)

The final legislative hurdle to creating a more resource efficient Europe has been overcome after the Council of the European Union approved the EU’s Circular Economy Package (CEP) in Brussels on Tuesday, 22 May 2018.

The final ratification by the Council comes a little over a month after MEPs in the European Parliament gave the set of revised waste directives their seal of approval, ratifying the targets agreed upon following the end of three-way discussions known as trilogues between the European Council, Commission and Parliament back in December, which were then approved by EU ambassadors in February this year. The announcement marks the end of a long journey through the institutions since the Juncker Commission put the current legislation forward in 2015, after withdrawing a draft CEP put forward in July 2014 that included a 70 per cent recycling and reuse target for 2030.

Progress on moving towards a circular economy has been steady since the start of the year, as a Monitoring Framework to measure the EU’s progress towards the CEP targets was also proposed by the European Commission in March, while a Plastics Strategy was agreed at the start of March, with an aim of making all plastic packaging recyclable by 2030.

The new legislation means that EU member states will be obliged to reach a 55 per cent municipal recycling rate by 2025, 60 per cent by 2030 and 65 per cent by 2035. Confusion over the headline target was apparent in the first few months of the year, with many reporting the 65 per cent figure as the 2030 target, as opposed to the 2035 target.

Specific targets for packaging for 2030 are also included for all packaging (70 per cent), plastic (55 per cent), wood (30 per cent), ferrous metals (80 per cent), aluminium (60 per cent), glass (75 per cent) and paper and cardboard (85 per cent).
In addition to material-specific targets, member states will have until 1 January 2025 to set up a separate collection for textile waste and hazardous waste from households and until 31 December 2023 to ensure that bio-waste is either collected separately or recycled at source (e.g., home composting).

A landfill reduction target is also included in the package, with member states expected to ensure that, as of 2030, all waste suitable for recycling or other recovery shall not be accepted in landfills, except waste for which landfilling is the best environmental outcome. In addition, member states will ensure that by 2035 the amount of municipal waste being sent to landfill is reduced to less than 10 per cent of the total amount of municipal waste generated.

Furthermore, the new legislation foresees more use of effective economic instruments and other measures in support of the waste hierarchy. Producers are given an important role in this transition by making them responsible for their products when they become waste. New requirements for extended producer responsibility schemes to improve their performance and governance are included in the CEP. In addition, mandatory extended producer responsibility schemes have to be established for all packaging by 2024.
Now that the Council has ratified the CEP, it will enter into force 20 days after its publication in the Official Journal, with 24 months allowed for the governments of member states to transpose the new laws into national legislation.

Despite the perpetual uncertainty surrounding Brexit and the form of the UK’s future relationship with the EU, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) has indicated that the CEP will apply to the UK following Brexit, even going so far as to suggest that the UK would set even more ambitious targets than those contained in the landmark European agreement.

Commenting on the announcement, EU Commissioner for Environment, Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, Karmenu Vella, said: “The final approval of new EU waste rules by the Council marks an important moment for the circular economy in Europe. The new recycling and landfilling targets set a credible and ambitious path for better waste management in Europe. Our main task now is to ensure that the promises enshrined in this waste package are delivered on the ground. The Commission will do all it can to support Member States and make the new legislation deliver on the ground.”

Neno Dimov, Bulgarian Minister of Environment and Water, added: “I am very pleased that ministers have given their approval to the revised legislation on waste today. Europe is moving towards a circular economy. These new rules protect not only our environment but also the health of our citizens. Today we close the loop of product lifecycles, from production and consumption to waste management. This decision is about making our economies more sustainable and environmentally-friendly.”

Link to original article

Circle Lab, biggest global open access innovation platform for the circular economy, launches 1,000 new case studies — Circle Economy

Circle Lab invites the global community to tackle humanity’s biggest challenges with circular solutions by applying the most up-to-date knowledge on the circular economy After a successful launch in March 2018, Circle Lab introduces a new product feature today: the world’s biggest circular economy database, openly accessible and searchable for everyone. This is the…

via Circle Lab, biggest global open access innovation platform for the circular economy, launches 1.000 new case studies — Circle Economy

🇬🇧 Startup what3words provides a precise global address system… with just 3 words!

Founded in 2013 and already funded with USD 13.8m in 8 rounds, London-based startup What3Words is revolutionising coordination around the globe. What do I mean? Watch!

The fields of appliation are manifold but, most probably, the strongest impact will be felt by those in need …

… not neglecting the fun you could miss out not finding your friends.

In order to hear more about it please enjoy Chris Sheldrick’s (Co-Founder & CEO) TED Talk!

By the way, may I recommned you an amazing hidden place in my favourite city…  😉  exposing.pints.tweaked

Link to company website